What’s Procurement’s Role for 2018?

Watchdog.

As we enter the new year, the predictions and prognostications are going to get crazy again. And, like always, they are going to be of the obvious variety or, as the public defender points out, of the wild guesses.

But the reality is that from a process, power and performance perspective, not much will change … it will be the continual slow prod forward that it has been for the last decade. However, as the past few years have shown us, one thing is constant. Suppliers will fail. Disruptions and Disasters will happen. And your technology vendors will get acquired.

We’ll start with this last point first. Over the past year, Jaggaer and Coupa tried to outdo each other in an acquisition frenzy. Spend360 and Pool4Tool and Trade Extensions and BravoSolution all scooped up by Procurement space giants trying to get bigger. No matter how big, how successful, how stable, or how much they indicate a desire to remain independent, they could literally be scooped up tomorrow. Everyone has their price, and if it’s a PE firm, the company is flipped as soon as that price is met. And as we discussed in our recent post on M&A on how The Mania Continues, if this means there is solution duplication, at some point, you can be pretty much assured someone’s solution is going away. M&A’s are done to enhance synergy of offering or enhance profit through synergy of operation where you can reduce staff and product footprint against a larger customer base.

This means that Procurement has to expect that, at some point, at least one of its preferred platforms is going up in smoke, and has to be on the ball to identify what platform may be at risk, when, and what steps will have to be taken to mitigate that risk.

Similarly, it will have to insure it is keeping an eye on all critical suppliers — which, as the best know, is not just the 20% of suppliers who get 80% of the spend, but any sole-source or dual-source supplier that supplies a product or service critical to the organization’s primary product lines. If the product line could not be offered, or not offered to the full extent, without that supplier, any impending issues need to be detected early. This will mean keeping an eye on the organization’s credit risk, timeliness (if shipments get later and later, that could be an indication of trouble), sustainability ratings, negative mentions in the news, and so on. (An SRM solution that integrates with risk watchdogs will be critical.)

And, finally, it has to be on the alert for natural or man-made disasters that can pose a risk to parts of its global supply chains. It not only needs to know when an event happens that could affect a critical part of its supply base, but what suppliers in particular will be effected.

It has to be a watchdog on constant alert. Just sourcing and negotiating great deals is not enough. They have to be realized. And, for that, Procurement must be the best watchdog there is.

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