Monthly Archives: December 2010

New Year’s Eve Blues

Flamewars and pixel fights
Back and forth in net leet
Twitter noise, another tweet
Things too hard to believe –
so log off

My heart’s in the real world
My brain’s online without you
All my friends are checkin’ Facebook
Talkin’ bad about you know who who who
My hand’s typin’ riddles
But I just can’t seem to find a clue
So I take a swig of whiskey
And jump into the chat room without a view

And I just can’t seem to break the shackles of the New Year’s Eve blues
I got the New Year’s Eve blues
I got the New Year’s Eve blues
I got the New Year’s Eve blues
I got the New Year’s Eve blues
And I just can’t seem to break the shackles of the New Year’s Eve blues

Bugs in the codebase
Worms in the server farm
All my neighbors think I’m crazy
And my girl thinks I’m losin’ my cool cool cool
And I just can’t seem to break the shackles of the New Year’s Eve blues
I got the New Year’s Eve blues
I got the New Year’s Eve blues
I got the New Year’s Eve blues
I got the New Year’s Eve blues
And I just can’t seem to break the shackles of the New Year’s Eve blues

Don’t look to 4chan to change your seasons
It’s the American dream
Souls of hackers, wireless streams
Can’t seem to find no peace so log off

And I just can’t seem to break the shackles of the New Year’s Eve blues
I got the New Year’s Eve blues
I got the New Year’s Eve blues
I got the New Year’s Eve blues
I got the New Year’s Eve blues
And I just can’t seem to break the shackles of the New Year’s Eve blues

I got the blues, I got the blues, I got the blues,
I got the blues
I got the blues, I got the blues, I got the blues …


To the tune of City Boy Blues by Motley Crue.

SpendFool, New Year’s Eve Day just isn’t the same without you.

2010 Was A Sad Year for Innovation

After reading the top six innovation ideas of 2011, it only re-emphasized my belief that 2010 was a dead-end year innovation-wise. I don’t even want to think about what could be worse. Consider:

  • Contestification
    Can’t sell your product? Use digital media to crowd-source your marketing ideas from your customers while overpaying your CMO!
  • Keep Touching Me and I’ll Screen!
    Why read an article when you can touch, tap, stroke, finger, fondle, and pinch content-free videos?
  • WWWabs
    Why spend money doing proper software development and quality assurance when you can release crappy beta and let your customers QA for you?
  • That’s Quite A Coup, Onward Group!
    Digital coupon sites are now a six billion dollar enterprise.
  • From Farmville to Pharmville: We Got Game in Business
    As the economy went down the tubes, mindless games became a trillion dollar industry.
  • A Beautifully Designed Lobby
    In 2011, a marginal dollar invested in a lobbying campaign may yield far greater returns than a dollar invested in a brave new technology innovation.

All-in-all, it’s depressing.

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CSA 2010 – Yet Another Act to Increase Your Logistics Costs

Not that long ago, I warned you that black boxes are coming for logistics carriers and that while they are unlikely to make a significant impact on safety, they are going to make a significant impact on your logistics carriers’ operational costs and your logistics costs. Now I’m going to warn you about the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Comprehensive Safety Analysis 2010 (FMCSA CSA 2010) which is also more likely to increase your costs than your supply chain safety.

The initiative, designed to achieve a greater reduction in large truck and bus crashes, injuries, and fatalities contains four elements:

  1. measurement,
  2. intervention,
  3. safety evaluation and information technology, and
  4. COMPASS.

COMPASS is a comprehensive overhaul of the way FMCSA and its partners collect, manage, and convey safety information which requires a major overhaul of the IT infrastructure and the implementation of a portal, database, data warehouse, mobile interface, and data exchange.

But the costly step is intervention. If the measurement system indicates that the FMCSA needs to intervene with a logistics carrier, the FMCSA, depending on severity, can:

  • issue a warning letter,
  • perform a targeted roadside inspection,
  • do an off-site investigation, and/or
  • do an on-site investigation.

And if an issue is discovered, the FMCSA can issue a comprehensive notice of claim/settlement to the carrier, and increase their costs, which increases yours.

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Should You Really Care About the Finance Classification Hierarchy?

A recent article in CPO Agenda on a meeting of the minds that discussed the need for Procurement and Finance to establish a common framework put forward five suggestions on what an organization can do to make it happen. Four of the suggestions were really great, but the last one, which said that Procurement and Finance should “establish common organization and spend classification hierarchies in spend analytic and value-tracking pipeline tools” has me scratching my head.

If the article had suggested that Procurement and Finance should establish a common reference classification hierarchy that Procurement could map too, that would be different, but instead the article says that “the spend analytics programme and value-tracking pipeline should share a common organization and spend classification framework“. There are two problems with this logic.

First, there is the built-in fallacy that one spend cube is enough. It’s not. You need a spend cube for AP data, a spend cube for Invoice data, a spend cube for utilization data, etc. You need a spend cube, and an appropriate hierarchy, for everything you can think of analyzing. The real savings in spend analysis doesn’t come from analyzing canned reports — it comes from having a hunch, analyzing the data, and walking away with either a savings opportunity or a better informed hunch as to where the savings opportunity truly lies. A true spend analysis system lets the user build new cubes and hierarchies at will, because, otherwise, data analysis is avoided and savings go unrealized.

Secondly, the hierarchy most appropriate to Finance and the financial and tax reporting they need to do is often the least appropriate hierarchy for Procurement and the spend analysis it needs to do. As a result, a compromise isn’t going to help either party. It’s just going to create a common language that Finance can use to explain why it now takes them 50% longer to do reporting and that Procurement can use to explain why they can’t find any savings opportunities.

The answer is to define a common reference classification that each side can map too after they performed their analysis and created their reports. After all, ETL Tools are a dime a dozen these days, and most good spend analysis or BI tools come with one or more built in. As a result, such mappings can be easily automated to occur automatically on a fixed interval or after analysis is completed and each department can then view the hierarchy in a manner that makes sense to them. No need for unproductive compromises.

However, as mentioned at the start of the post, the other four suggestions are good. To develop a common language:

  • Establish a savings framework (and definitions),
  • define and implement a disciplined engagement model,
  • produce timely, consistent, and accurate reporting, and
  • capture opportunities created for profit improvement.

Check out a meeting of the minds for more details.

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GSP going away January 1, 2011

Editor’s Note: Today’s post is from Dick Locke, Sourcing Innovation’s resident expert on International Sourcing and Procurement. (His previous contributions are still archived.)

The U.S. Congress recessed without passing the legislation required to
continue the GSP program beyond January 1, 2011.

You do know what the GSP program is, don’t you? If not, you might
consider acquiring some training. It’s a program called the Generalized System of Preferences (guide) under which imports from about 135 developing countries have been given duty free treatment by the US. Due to congressional
inaction, US importers will now be facing higher duties on many goods. Goods
that were now eligible for duty free treatment will jump to the level
that would be paid for goods from developed countries starting January
1st. Among the 135 countries, the most notable are India, Thailand,
Turkey, Indonesia and the Philippines. There is probably a lot of
material already in the pipeline.

This is the third time within my memory that this has happened. The last
two times, Congress passed enabling legislation quickly after returning
from recess. The made the legislation retroactive so people who paid
high duties got them refunded. However, the next Congress is a bit
unpredictable, with a lot of new members who are likely to be
anti-import. Stay tuned.

Dick Locke, Global Procurement Group.