Category Archives: Spend Analysis

PRGX: Optics on Optix

In our last post, we noted that, as written by the doctor and the prophet over on Spend Matters Pro (membership required) in the PRGX Intro, PRGX is one of a select number of dominant services provider in the niche market for recovery audit services — a market that unlike other procurement services faces tremendous price pressure for its core recovery, statement and related auditing and profit recovery services but also a vendor that has started to remake itself quietly from within.

As a result, as indicated in our last post, PRGX has built the most complete, and in many ways the most advanced, analytics and recovery solution for the retail sector and, in doing so, has built one of the most complete and advanced analytics and recovery solutions for just about any sector that buys and relies on goods. It does this via two platforms, Optix, which has deep Payment, Spend, and Product analytics, and Lavante, which has deep SIM and automated recovery prevention analytics. (We expect they will eventually be merged, but, for now, they are separate.)

As we have covered Lavante multiple times in the past, we’re going to focus on introducing the features of Optix.

Spend Optix

Spend Optix is designed to help an organization get deep insight into their category spend like a typical spend analysis platform for Sourcing and Procurement. Reporting revolves around categories and suppliers. It is also the only PRGX product that today has a built-in report builder, which can build spend reports across pre-defined dimensions and fields. The product is designed to help you understand spend category performance, spend under contract, invoice-vs-supplier insights, item price variance, and commodity cost indices.

This product can also be configured to track all contracts, all meta data of interest, and relate the contracts to the relevant categories and products. This allows a user to drill into a contract from a category, a category from a contract, and create accurate “address spend” reports, as will be described below. The ease of use is not at the level of Lavante SIM, but we expect that will change over time.

Payment Optix

Payment Optix is designed to help an organization get deep insight into their payments and related metrics and, in particular, DPO (days payable outstanding), PO (purchase order) vs. Non-PO spend, deep AP analytics, and risk insights.

The home screen, as with the other OPTIX products, is a dashboard with key metrics and graphs, such as invoices processed by month, DPO, Benford’s law (by invoice amount or value), and related metrics that an organization wants to see on a daily basis. The platform is drill-down report oriented, and the reports are segmented into Invoice Processing, DPO, and Risk Management.

Product Optix

Product Optix is designed to help an organization get deep insight into their product pool, including net margin, equivalent products, and best supplier funding opportunities. Reporting revolves around categories, suppliers, and deals.

The best part is the product detail report which brings up not only detailed product information, but the most complete product margin breakdown report you ever did see. With their extremely strong background in retail, PRGX understands true lifecycle margin calculations as good as anyone and it shines through in their report.

This is just a brief overview of what PRGX can do. For a much deeper dive, see the Pro series (Part I, Part II, and Part III) by the doctor and the prophet over on Spend Matters Pro (membership required) that also dives into strengths and weaknesses and a very detailed SWOT analysis to help you understand where they fit.

Is UNSPSC Really the Best Route? 3 Reasons … ‘Against’


Today’s guest post is from Brian Seipel, Spend Analysis lead at Source One Management Services focused on helping corporations gain a clear view of their spend data to derive actionable budget optimization strategies.

In Part I, we discussed three reasons for the standardized taxonomy of UNSPSC. But it’s not always all sunshine and roses. Today we will discuss three reasons against.


The Downsides of a Standardizes Taxonomy

Recall I mentioned that standard taxonomies are a great start. However, we will want to move beyond the confines of these models to compensate for a few critical problems you’re likely to face.

  • Alignment to organizational needs and strategic sourcing goals may be lacking
  • Structural rigidity may not align with organizational profile
  • Contain a good degree of built-in granularity (yes, this is both a strength and a weakness)

All three problems above come down to a lack of proper fit – both in terms of organizational usage and an action-oriented focus.

First, let’s return to our overarching goal: to make sense of spend and identify areas of focus for future savings initiatives. Looking at UNSPSC through this lens, you may find that it difficult to source strictly according to this taxonomy. I’ll give an easy example – when organizations bring in commercial printers for promotional materials, they tend to also buy branded tchotchkes from these same vendors. It makes sense; both items are planned for and purchased at the same time to be used at the same events. Suppliers often work in both of these spaces for this reason, but you wouldn’t know it following UNSPSC strictly. We’re in two separate areas of the code. As a harder example, think about your trusted, value-added IT vendor. This supplier may provide hardware and software across a range of departments, integration and engineering support, and handle your maintenance contract after installation. Draft up a list of products and services, and pull a UNSPSC code to cover all aspects of this supplier relationship – go ahead, I’ll wait. If I had to guess, you likely quit halfway through writing up a pretty long list.

Second, these are rigid structures are inherently one-size-fits-most in nature. UNSPSC can be great for some industries, but may not align well to others. I mention earlier that UNSPSC did tend to get detailed in a number of areas and, if you’re primary focus leans toward the machinery or MRO side of procurement, you may never need to venture beyond UNSPSC. However, any company with a more specialty focus may not get the coverage they need. The purchase of specialty chemicals may have a head start by using UNSPSC as a baseline, but the taxonomy won’t have the granularity to truly understand purchases as-is. One way to solve this issue is to blend additional supplementary detail where needed to make up the difference.

I will close this section with a word of caution. Twice now I’ve talked about the power of granularity, either already found in UNSPSC or added as a supplement afterwards. As such, it may seem odd that I’m considering categorical granularity as both a strength and a weakness – which case ends up being true for you will largely depend on what you’re doing with this level of detail. If you can use this granularity for better isolating and targeting savings opportunities, then throw this under the strength column. However, “paralysis by analysis” is a very real threat to a timely spend analysis project. Consider office supply purchases. One could easily adopt a taxonomy to drill down to a very granular level, separating black ink, felt tip pens from blue ink, ball points – but, would you ever really want to? Always ask yourself, “is more granularity truly necessary to get at the heart of this spend? Will this place of lesser detail hinder this project?” If you don’t need more detail, don’t invest the time. In this case, both pens would be purchased by the same internal groups and from the same suppliers. Spending time classifying to this level, or holding meetings on the best way to characterize paperclip groupings, is a waste.

Never Forget your Ultimate Purpose

It can be tempting to opt for a standard taxonomy, as is offered by UNSPSC. The value they provide is especially obvious early in the process when faced with dirty data, particularly if this is your organization’s first foray into spend analysis.

This temptation, however, will always be short-sighted. It is critical to wrangle spend and develop a clear picture of where your organization’s cash is going, true, but doing so without a clear path forward (one that leads to cost savings) is only going to stagnate strategic sourcing initiatives, leading to lost opportunity costs.

Always stay focused on answering this key question, “what is my best path forward to identifying savings opportunities?” and develop a taxonomy that will lead you there. Starting with UNSPSC can be a great foundation, but always consider where the taxonomy falls short for achieving your goals, and fold in more customized categories of spend where appropriate.

Thanks, Brian!

Is UNSPSC Really the Best Route? 3 Reasons ‘For’ …


Today’s guest post is from Brian Seipel, Spend Analysis lead at Source One Management Services focused on helping corporations gain a clear view of their spend data to derive actionable budget optimization strategies.

A common question many organizations have when delving into a spend analysis project is, “which classification taxonomy should I be using?” There are plenty of options on the generic end of the spectrum, UNSPSC being a popular choice. These standards certainly have their advantages, but choosing whether to use one of these standards or something entirely different is ultimately a matter of what will work best for the task at hand.

So, the real question is – What is your primary goal, and which taxonomy will best help you reach it?


Defining Goals

Before we begin, it is important to define what, exactly, our goals are for our spend analysis project. In this case, the spend analysis will be directly supporting the identification of strategic sourcing projects.
Certainly, we want to view our organization-wide supplier base and spend profiles using a commonly understood model so all stakeholders, departments, and C-suite executives are on the same page. One problem many organizations face is that different departments or offices speak different languages when it comes to defining supplier relationships. Add a merger or acquisition to the mix, and chaos can easily ensue.

But this isn’t our end goal – this is just a single, albeit crucial, step in the process. Our true end goal is to provide the ammunition needed to best identify opportunities for cost saving initiatives. No taxonomy, no matter how thoughtful or detailed, can be considered valuable if it can’t help promote change. As such, we should select a taxonomy based on two key parameters:

  1. The taxonomy must be universally applicable to all company spend.
  2. The taxonomy must aid in developing actionable information for future cost saving initiatives.


The Benefits of a Standardized Taxonomy

First, let’s discuss the key reasons to choose a standard model, such as UNSPSC. There are a few great aspects to these model that make them a good starting place for your taxonomy development:

  • Standards are pre-developed and ready-to-use
  • Contain a *good* degree of built-in granularity
  • Wide availability of data enrichment options exist

Right off the bat, one of the largest draws of using a standard taxonomy is that the structure is already in place, ready-to-use. UNSPSC has you covered for any spend your organization is likely to see, from office supplies (commodity code “4412″) to graphic design (“8214″) and beyond. Additionally, there is already a level of granularity at your fingertips: The telecommunications media services includes 10 immediate sublevels with greater detail, from local and long distance service, to mobile communications, and more.

You’ll note my asterisks here; while this granularity is great in many cases, it isn’t always up-to-task across the purchasing spectrum – more on that later. In any case, if you’ve been tasked with the herculean job of collecting, cleansing, and ordering a vast set of spend data covering your entire organization, being able to pick up and implement a taxonomy immediately is one less task on your plate to worry about.

What’s more, this hierarchy is both well-known and heavily utilized. There are plenty of organizations you can turn to that, for a fee, can append your spend data with appropriate categorizations. The appeal here is obvious – one of the more time intensive elements of performing a spend analysis is either developing and validating a rules-based system for categorization or slogging through the process manually.

Jump in feet first, hit the ground running … Pick your action-packed metaphor; a standard taxonomy gets your project started faster – and that’s huge.

But is it all sunshine and roses? Stay tuned for Part II!

PRGX – The Biggest Analytics Provider You Don’t Know!


For those that do not know it, PRGX would appear to be one of a select number of dominant services provider in the niche market for recovery audit services — a market that unlike other procurement services faces tremendous price pressure for its core recovery, statement and related auditing and profit recovery services.

the doctor and the prophet, PRGX Intro on Spend Matters Pro (membership required)

In particular, PRGX would appear to be a recovery audit specialist for the global retail sector. And that is what they are, but that is not all they are.


PRGX has started to remake itself quietly from within — out of necessity, given these broader market trends — building and acquiring technology capabilities in the spend analytics and supplier management areas, both to expand its relevance and to start driving automation and scale in its core business.

PRGX has built the most complete, and in many ways the most advanced, analytics and recovery solution for the retail sector and, in doing so, has built one of the most complete and advanced analytics and recovery solutions for just about any sector that buys and relies on goods. Pharma, Manufacturing, and Aerospace and Defense, just to name a few, could all benefit intensely from the out-of-the-box PRGX solution.

This is because it has evolved it’s application from a simple recovery analytics application to a full featured analytics solutions with modules for:

  • Payment Analytics
  • Spend Analytics
  • Product Analytics
  • Recovery Avoidance Analytics
  • Supplier Information Management

With the latter two coming through its recent acquisition of Lavante.

It can analyze what you paid (payment analytics), what you should have paid (recovery analytics), what you are spending (spend analytics), how much that is costing you and profiting you on a product level (product analytics), and what suppliers are supplying that product and how they are performing (SIM with a hefty dose of SPM).

And it can do this analysis end to end around a product or category, and allow you to simultaneously see what you ordered, spent, overspent, took in on sales, lost on returns, and profited when all was said and done. It’s one of the most powerful analytics solutions you don’t know about. Stay tuned — there is more to come!

Do You Need a Spend Cube to Identify Top Underperforming Products?

No, you don’t. But that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t have one!

Let’s face it, if you have an n-step process that can theoretically be done in a spreadsheet, then it can be done in a spreadsheet — but how long will it take to do it in a spreadsheet vs. doing it in a modern spend analysis solution?

If sub-steps of the process consist of:

  1. researching and accumulating industry specific data
  2. comparing your data to industry averages
  3. repeating the comparisons with selected competitors, putting your place in their shoes
  4. looking for anomalies
  5. selecting top categories outside industry average
  6. selecting top underperforming products within those categories

How long is it going to take without a proper spend analysis product?

Industry data is going to come in many different forms, in many different tables, and will initially need to be stored in many different sheets. It will take a lot of manual effort and data formatting to get the data into a consistent format that will allow it all to be compared apples to apples. In contrast, a good spend analysis platform with ETL will allow for data to be automatically mapped to the right format will easily save hours or days of manual effort, as most good data tables will be detailed and large.

Comparisons in spreadsheets require lots of formulas and calculations, which can be tedious and error-prone to implement. Modern spend analysis packages come with lots of standard reports and templates that will allow for comparisons with industry averages and available competitor data out of the box. Again you will be saving hours, if not days, with a good package.

Anomalies are really easy to see in appropriate scatter plots, but very, very hard to spot in rows of data. If you have thousands of rows, how do you detect outliers with a manual scan? Sure you can pivot on volume or distance from average and so on, but is it really an outlier? Careful inspection and analysis is required on each potential row — but a visual glance at an appropriate scatter plot gives you results in seconds.

So no, you don’t need a modern spend analysis product or a spend cube to identify good potential opportunities, if you don’t mind dedicating a back room full of people for days or weeks to do an analysis that can be done by a good spend analysis product in a few hours.

And that’s why modern spend analysis solutions can deliver an ROI of more than 10% year over year as the expected value of analysis is typically above water, vs. under it, as it is when you do it manually. (See this classic post on .)

So while you don’t need a spend analysis solution, it’s akin to saying you don’t need modern technology for sourcing either. There’s nothing you can’t do with pen, paper, and telephone, but do you really want to remain in the dark ages?

As far as SI is concerned, there are only three reasons someone trying to sell you a sourcing suite would tell you that you don’t need a modern spend analysis solution (based on proper spend cubes):

  • they don’t have it and they don’t want you to use another vendor in case that vendor also has, or implements, a comparable sourcing solution (and they fear competition);
  • they want the services revenue (there’s a lot of billable hours to doing it manually); or
  • they truly don’t understand what modern spend analysis can do

And none of these reasons are good reasons. In fact, they are all reasons to be wary of the provider! There are only two cornerstone technologies that set leading sourcing organizations apart, and analytics is one. (The other is optimization.)